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RESUMES

INTRODUCTION    THE BASICS    WHERE TO START?

    TYPES OF RESUMES:    Chronological    Functional    Combination

RESUME DO'S AND DON'TS    10 QUICK TIPS FOR RESUME SUCCESS    9 WORST RESUME MISTAKES
10 WAYS YOUR RESUME IRKS HIRING MANAGERS    DON'T MAKE THESE MISTAKES
    RESUME LINKS    STYLE TIPS

WHAT'S IN A NAME    CONTACT INFORMATION    WORK EXPERIENCE, EDUCATION & SKILLS


WHERE TO START?

You might see a hurdle to leap over. Or a hoop to jump through. Or a barrier to knock down. That is how many people think of resumes, application forms, cover letters, and interviews. But you do not have to think of them that way. They are not ways to keep you from a job; they are ways for you to show an employer what you know and what you can do. After all, you are going to get a job. It is just a question of which one.

Employers want to hire people who can do the job. To learn who these people are, they use resumes, application forms, written tests, performance tests, medical examinations, and interviews. You can use each of these different evaluation procedures to your advantage. You might not be able to make a silk purse out of a sow's ear, but at least you can show what a good ear you have.

Creating Effective Resumes and Application Forms

Resumes and application forms are two ways to achieve the same goal: To give the employer written evidence of your qualifications. When creating a resume or completing an application form, you need two different kinds of information: Facts about yourself and facts about the job you want. With this information in hand, you can present the facts about yourself in terms of the job. You have more freedom with a resume--you can put your best points first and avoid blanks. But, even on application forms, you can describe your qualifications in terms of the job's duties.

bullet Know thyself.  Begin by assembling information about yourself. Some items appear on virtually every resume or application form, including the following:
bullet Current address and phone number--if you are rarely at home during business hours, try to give the phone number of a friend or relative who will take messages for you.
bullet Job sought or career goal.
bullet Experience (paid and volunteer) -- date of employment, name and full address of the employer, job title, starting and finishing salary, and reason for leaving (moving, returning to school, and seeking a better position are among the readily accepted reasons).
bullet Education--the school's name, the city in which it is located, the years you attended it, the diploma or certificate you earned, and the course of studies you pursued.
bullet Other qualifications--hobbies, organizations you belong to, honours you have received, and leadership positions you have held.
bullet Office machines, tools, and equipment you have used and skills that you possess.
bullet Know thy job.  Next, gather specific information about the jobs you are applying for. You need to know the pay range (so you can make their top your bottom), education and experience usually required, hours and shifts usually worked. Most importantly, you need to know the job duties (so that you can describe your experience in terms. of those duties). Study the job description. Some job announcements, especially those issued by a government, even have a checklist that assigns a numerical weight to different qualifications so that you can be certain as to which is the most important; looking at such announcements will give you an idea of what employers look for even if you do not wish to apply for a government job. If the announcement or ad is vague, call the employer to learn what is sought.

Once you have the information you need, you can prepare a resume. You may need to prepare more than one master resume if you are going to look for different kinds of jobs. Otherwise, your resume will not fit the job you seek.

http://www.cyber-north.com/resume/