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RESUMES

INTRODUCTION    THE BASICS    WHERE TO START?

    TYPES OF RESUMES:    Chronological    Functional    Combination

RESUME DO'S AND DON'TS    10 QUICK TIPS FOR RESUME SUCCESS    9 WORST RESUME MISTAKES
10 WAYS YOUR RESUME IRKS HIRING MANAGERS    DON'T MAKE THESE MISTAKES
    RESUME LINKS    STYLE TIPS

WHAT'S IN A NAME    CONTACT INFORMATION    WORK EXPERIENCE, EDUCATION & SKILLS


TYPES OF RESUMES

Chronological    Functional    Combination

There are two kinds of resumes.

The way you arrange your resume depends on how well your experience seems to prepare you for the position you want. Basically, you can either describe your most recent job first and work backwards (reverse chronology) or group similar skills together. No matter which format you use, the following advice applies generally.

bullet Use specifics. A vague description of your duties will make only a vague impression.
bullet Identify accomplishments. If you headed a project, improved productivity, reduced costs, increased membership, or achieved some other goal, say so.
bullet Type your resume, using a standard typeface. (Printed resumes are becoming more common, but employers do not indicate a preference for them.)
bullet Keep the length down to two pages at the most.
bullet Remember your mother's advice not to say anything if you cannot say something nice. Leave all embarrassing or negative information off the resume--but be ready to deal with it in a positive fashion at the interview.
bullet Proofread the master copy carefully.
bullet Have someone else proofread the master copy carefully.
bullet Have a third person proofread the master copy carefully.
bullet Use the best quality photocopying machine and good white or off-white paper.

A reverse chronological resume is the easiest method to use. It is also the least effective because it makes when you did something more important than what you can do. It is an especially poor format if you have gaps in your work history, if the job you seek is very different from the job you currently hold, or if you are just entering the job market. About the only time you would want to use such a resume is when you have progressed up a clearly defined career ladder and want to move up a rung.

Resumes that are not chronological may be called functional, analytical, skill oriented, creative, or some other name. The differences are less important than the similarity, which is that all stress what you can do. The advantage to a potential employer--and, therefore, to your job campaign--should be obvious. The employer can see immediately how you will fit the job. This format also has advantages for many job hunters because it camouflages gaps in paid employment and avoids giving prominence to irrelevant jobs.

You begin writing a functional resume by determining the skills the employer is looking for. Study the job description for this information. Next, review your experience and education to see when you demonstrated the ability sought. Then prepare the resume itself, putting first the information that relates most obviously to the job. The result will be a resume with headings such as "Engineering," "Computer Languages," "Communications Skills," or "Design Experience." These headings will have much more impact than the dates that you would use on a chronological resume.

http://www.cyber-north.com/resume/